Book Chat 9/30/16

Here are the featured books from Sept. 30th with Lisa Voss, Scott Clark, Becky Wurm Clark and Liz Bauer:

From Junk Food to Joy Food
by Joy Bauer [641.5 Bau]

We all want to look and feel better, but where?s the fun in nibbling on boring salads and choking down steamed broccoli? It?s tough sticking to a diet when you?re craving barbecue ribs, fettucine Alfredo, vegetable lo mein, and chocolate milkshakes. But best-selling author and TODAY show nutrition expert Joy Bauer is fresh from her kitchen with news for you: You can have your cheesecake and eat it, too! In these bright, colorful pages, Joy shares how you can drop the calories in your most fattening favorites?without compromising flavor. With a few simple tricks, she transforms a bacon cheeseburger from a whopping 1,100 calories to a mere 425 . . . and General Tso?s Chicken from an alarming 1,000 to a slimming 260. From Boston cream pie to spaghetti and meatballs, mint chocolate chip ice cream to Buffalo wings with creamy bleu cheese dip, Joy takes the most decadent treats from fat to fit. Want to give a BLT some TLC? Joy?s take on this classic comfort food could save you 35,000 calories annually?with the potential to drop 10 pounds! Featuring more than 120 recipes and oodles of gorgeous photos, From Junk Food to Joy Food has you covered from sun up to late night: breakfasts, dips, soups, sides, suppers, pizzas, pastas, desserts, mocktails, and more. Don?t deny yourself the flavors you love?learn to make them with joy!

 

The Defense
by Steve Cavanaugh [Cavanaugh]

Eddie Flynn used to be a con artist. Then he became a lawyer. Turns out the two aren’t that different.

Former con artist turned lawyer Eddie Flynn gave up the law a year ago after a disastrous case, and he vowed never to step foot in a courtroom again. But now he doesn’t have a choice. The head of the Russian mob in New York City, on trial for murder, has kidnapped Eddie’s ten-year-old daughter: Eddie has to take this case whether he likes it or not.

Using his razor-sharp wit and every con, bluff, grift, and trick in the book, Eddie has only forty-eight hours to defend an impossible murder trial. And if he loses this case, he loses everything.

 

Geek Love
by Katherine Dunn [Dunn]

If you liked the “Freak Show” season of TV’s American Horror Story, this may appeal to you. Geek Love is the story of the Binewskis, a carny family whose mater- and paterfamilias set out-with the help of amphetamine, arsenic, and radioisotopes-to breed their own exhibit of human oddities. There’s Arturo the Aquaboy, who has flippers for limbs and a megalomaniac ambition worthy of Genghis Khan . . . Iphy and Elly, the lissome Siamese twins . . . albino hunchback Oly, and the outwardly normal Chick, whose mysterious gifts make him the family’s most precious-and dangerous-asset. As the Binewskis take their act across the backwaters of the U.S., inspiring fanatical devotion and murderous revulsion; as its members conduct their own Machiavellian version of sibling rivalry, Geek Love throws its sulfurous light on our notions of the freakish and the normal, the beautiful and the ugly, the holy and the obscene. Family values will never be the same.

 

Cemetery Girl: Inheritance, Book Two
by Charlaine Harris, Christopher Gordon and Don Kramer [741.5 Har]

She calls herself Calexa Rose Dunhill. She has been living — hiding out — in Dunhill Cemetery ever since someone left her there to die. She has no idea who wants her dead or why, but she isn’t about to wait around for her would-be killer to finish the job. Despite her self-imposed isolation, Calexa’s ability to see spirits — and the memories she receives from them — guarantees she’ll never be alone, even among the deceased. The only living people she allows herself to interact with are Kelner, the cemetery’s cantankerous caretaker, and Lucinda Cameron, an elderly woman who lives in an old Victorian house across the street. With their friendship, Calexa has regained a link to the world beyond tombstones and mausoleums. Until the night she witnesses a murder that shatters her life?a life now under a police microscope — as their investigation threatens to uncover Calexa’s true identity? A graphic novel, with art by Don Kramer.

 

A Chorus of Cranes: The Cranes of North American and the World
by Paul Johnsgard with photographs by Thomas D. Mangelsen [598.32 Joh]

Accompanied by the stunning photography of Thomas D. Mangelsen, A Chorus of Cranes details the natural history, biology, and conservation issues surrounding the abundant sandhill crane and the endangered whooping crane in North America. Author Paul A. Johnsgard, one of the leading authorities on cranes and crane biology, describes the fascinating social behaviors, beautiful natural habitats, and grueling seasonal migrations that have stirred the hearts of people as far back as medieval times and garnered the crane a place in folklore and mythology across continents. Johnsgard has substantially updated and significantly expanded his 1991 work Crane Music, incorporating new information on the biology and status of these two North American cranes and providing abbreviated summaries on the other thirteen crane species of the world. The stories of these birds and their contrasting fates provide an instructive and moving history of bird conservation in North America. A Chorus of Cranes is a gorgeous and invaluable resource for crane enthusiasts, birders, natural historians, and conservationists alike.

 

Happy People Read and Drink Coffee
by Agnes Martin-Lugand [Martin-Lugand]

Diane seems to have the perfect life. She is a wife, a mother, and the owner of Happy People Read and Drink Coffee, a cozy literary cafe in Paris. But when she suddenly loses her beloved husband and daughter in a tragic car accident, the world as she knows it instantly vanishes. Trapped and haunted by her memories, Diane retreats from friends and family, unable and unwilling to move forward. But one year later, Diane shocks her loved ones and makes the surprising decision to move to a small town on the Irish coast, finally determined to heal and rebuild her life alone–until she meets Edward, the attractive yet taciturn Irish photographer who lives next door. At first abrasive and unwelcoming, Edward initially resents Diane’s intrusion into his life of solitude . . . until he can no longer keep her at arm’s length, and they fall into a surprising and tumultuous romance. But will it last when Diane leaves Ireland, and Edward, for the home she once ran away from in Paris? At once heartbreaking and uplifting, Diane’s story is deeply felt, reminding us that love remembered is love enduring.

 

The Taxidermist’s Daughter
by Kate Mosse [Mosse]

A chilling and spooky Gothic historical thriller reminiscent of Rebecca and The Turn of the Screw, dripping with the dark twists and eerie surprises that are the hallmarks of Edgar Allan Poe, from the New York Times and internationally bestselling author of Citadel.

In a remote village near the English coast, residents gather in a misty churchyard. More than a decade into the twentieth century, superstition still holds sway: It is St. Mark’s Eve, the night when the shimmering ghosts of those fated to die in the coming year are said to materialize and amble through the church doors.

Alone in the crowd is Constantia Gifford, the taxidermist’s daughter. Twenty-two and unmarried, she lives with her father on the fringes of town, in a decaying mansion cluttered with the remains of his once world-famous museum of taxidermy. No one speaks of why the museum was shuttered or how the Giffords fell so low. Connie herself has no recollection–a childhood accident has erased all memory of her earlier days. Even those who might have answers remain silent. The locals shun Blackthorn House, and the strange spinster who practices her father’s macabre art.

As the last peal of the midnight bell fades to silence, a woman is found dead–a stranger Connie noticed near the church. In the coming days, snippets of long lost memories will begin to tease through Connie’s mind, offering her glimpses of her vanished years. Who is the victim, and why has her death affected Connie so deeply? Why is she watched by a mysterious figure who has suddenly appeared on the marsh nearby? Is her father trying to protect her with his silence–or someone else? The answers are tied to a dark secret that lies at the heart of Blackthorn House, hidden among the bell jars of her father’s workshop–a mystery that draws Connie closer to danger . . . closer to madness . . . closer to the startling truth.

 

The Lost Girls
by Heather Young [Young]

In the summer of 1935, six-year-old Emily Evans vanished from her family’s vacation home on a remote Minnesota lake. The loss devastated the family. Sixty-four years later, Emily’s sister Lucy writes the story of that harrowing summer in a notebook that she bequeaths, along with the lake house and a hefty investment portfolio, to her grandniece, Justine. For Justine, the lake house offers a chance to give her own daughters a stable home she never had, but the dilapidated house is cold in the winter, the lake silent and forbidding, and her only neighbors are two strange old men who seem to know more than they’re telling about the summer of 1935. When Justine’s troubled oldest daughter becomes obsessed with Emily’s disappearance, Justine’s mother arrives wanting money, and Justine’s manipulative ex-boyfriend launches a plan to get her back, Justine must overcome her family’s tragic legacy in her effort to save herself and her children.

ere are the books featured on Problems & Solutions with Lisa Voss, Scott Clark and Becky Wurm Clark of the Lincoln City Libraries, along with our producer Liz Bauer: